Basics of writing a newspaper article

Without them the story may never be told. They assemble the material they have at hand and which they have researched and uncovered, and then they make the most important decision of all by asking the question - is there a story? If you decide that there is a story, you then need to think through which part or parts of it are of potential interest.

Basics of writing a newspaper article

Without them the story may never be told. They assemble the material they have at hand and which they have researched and uncovered, and then they make the most important decision of all by asking the question - is there a story?

Thousands of possible stories disappear each day because they fail to make it through this basics of writing a newspaper article stage of the production process, let's try to make sure that yours don't.

How to write journalism: News writing | Books | The Guardian

If you decide that there is a story, you then need to think through which part or parts of it are of potential interest. This affects how should you tell the story, what angle you should take and the main points you should try to get across.

Perhaps even more importantly, what you can leave out. There is almost never enough time or space for all your material.

Something usually has to go, and it's as well to start thinking about this sooner rather than later. Knowing what can be left out is a skill Writing a news story is a personal thing There are as many ways to write a story as there are people prepared to do it. Some will be better than others, some may even be dreadful, but they will all be different.

There is no pro forma or template to replace individual thought and application. Despite what you may hear about the objectivity of news, you as the writer cannot help being subjective because you are applying your own judgement and values. The important thing is that your judgement is not just a personal preference.

It is guided and based on journalistic principles. If you are knocked down by a car and break a leg, a limited number of people will be interested - your family and friends, of course, your employer, your insurance company, and just about nobody else.

The incident is unlikely to make a news item. If the president of your country is involved in a road accident, that is front-page news and maybe even the lead item in broadcast news bulletins. There is no template to replace individual thought and application Is a story newsworthy?

The different responses to these two events are a matter of judgement, of news judgement. A range of considerations comes into play every time you have to decide if a story is newsworthy or not.

Here are some of them: Is it reliable, trustworthy, independent, honest, believable? If you have doubts, can you carry out checks? Does it fit my output?

If you are writing for a sports magazine, you will probably not be too interested in finance, crime, science, international trade or health, unless there is a sports angle. What interest is there likely to be in what the individuals in the story are doing?

If it's a choice between you and the president, you lose every time. Will this story appeal to many of my readers, viewers, or listeners? There's not much point in carrying serious financial news in a celebrity-centred popular newspaper.

How unusual is this event or development? Something unexpected is more likely to make the news than a routine happening. Is this story new or has it been published before? If so, by whom?

Will it have been widely circulated, or will most people be learning about it for the first time? Even if the story is not recent, and the event many years old, it can still be worth running if the information has only just come to light.

Have we just had too many stories on this subject? Let's look for something else before we lose our audience through boredom? You have decided to run a story. One of the key stages in preparing it for publication comes next - how do you organise and structure the material?

Good news judgement can be developed over time There are two main models for news writing. One the pyramid, the other involves six honest men.

Pyramid journalism When you write an essay for a school project or devise a presentation for a business meeting, you assemble all the information, set it out in an orderly manner, link it together as appropriate, and finally present your conclusion.

It is an upside down pyramid, with the point - the conclusion - at the bottom, and all the supporting arguments and information above. News writing uses exactly the opposite technique.

You start with the essence of the story, for example, "The price of cotton has fallen by 15 per cent" and then add extra information - what impact will it have on producers, the textile industry, the national economy, world markets, consumer prices, employment, poverty; was it unexpected, what is being done about it, is it a short- or long-term change, how are people reacting to the news, and so on.A journalist writing a news story is the author, organiser and decision maker.

Without them the story may never be told.

basics of writing a newspaper article

They assemble the material they have at hand and which they have researched and uncovered, and then they make the most important decision of all by asking the question - is there.

24 thoughts on “ Write a How-to Article in 6 Easy Steps ” abdulwajidlakhani December 30, at am Researching a topic is very essential and is the area where many of us fails. Basics of writing a newspaper article This site is introduced to suit your needs using the OWL at Purdue (leslutinsduphoenix.com).

When printing this site, you have to would be . Oct 12,  · Writing a news article is different from writing other articles or informative pieces because news articles present information in a specific way.

It's important to be able to convey all the relevant information in a limited word count and give the facts to your target audience concisely%(). Writing a Newspaper Article. Teach students to turn their research and interviews into vibrant, interesting stories.

Grades. News articles cover the basics of current events. They answer the questions: who, what, where, how, and when? The best way to structure a newspaper article is to first write an outline.

Review your research and notes. Keith Waterhouse, the veteran Daily Mail and Daily Mirror columnist wrote an irresistible book on journalistic writing called Newspaper Style.

It was in fact an adaptation of the Mirror style book.

News writing tips for beginners