The growing concerns over the rate of violence in american college campuses

Governor Karyn Polito said. Santiago, Massachusetts Commissioner of Higher Education. These efforts will help reduce barriers and accelerate the timetable for students to complete their degrees. The College will develop a new Flexible Learning Model with hybrid learning classes in-person and online and "fast track" seven-week, back-to-back courses to allow Liberal Arts Transfer students to accelerate completion of their associate degrees.

The growing concerns over the rate of violence in american college campuses

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Law Enforcement and Violence: But the latest Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll also finds agreement across racial groups on many of the causes of police violence and further consensus that a number of changes in policies and procedures could be effective in reducing tensions between minorities and police and limiting violence against civilians.

Online and telephone interviews using landlines and cell phones were conducted with 1, adults, including blacks who were sampled at a higher rate than their proportion of the population for reasons of analysis. Violence against civilians by police officers is an extremely or very serious problem according to nearly three-quarters of blacks and less than 20 percent of whites.

Many Americans, both blacks and whites, say that violence against police is also an extremely or very serious problem in the United States. And half of all Americans, regardless of race, say fear caused by the physical danger that police officers face is a major contributor to aggression against civilians.

An overwhelming majority of blacks say that, generally, the police are too quick to use deadly force and that they are more likely to use it against a black person. Most whites say police officers typically use deadly force only when necessary and that race is not a factor in decisions to use force.

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Blacks and whites are sharply divided on whether police officers who injure or kill civilians are treated too leniently by prosecutors and on how much that contributes to the use of force against members of the public. Half of black Americans report being treated unfairly by police because of their race, and their views of law enforcement are shaped by this experience.

Blacks and whites agree that changes in policies and procedures could be effective in reducing tensions between minorities and police and in limiting violence against civilians.

There is widespread agreement that race relations in the United States are in a sorry state, but racial division exists on whether this contributes to police violence. The Public Is Split On Views About Police And Violence Americans are divided when it comes to their opinions about police and violence, with significant differences in attitudes based on race and ethnicity.

Thirty-two percent of adults say police violence against the public in the United States is an extremely or very serious problem, 35 percent report it is moderately serious, and 33 percent say it is not at all or not too serious a problem. Blacks are more likely to say police violence against the public in the United States is a very or extremely serious problem 73 percent than are whites 20 percent.

Just about half, 51 percent, of Hispanics describe police violence as a very or extremely serious problem. Distinct Racial Rifts On Police Use Of Force Fifty-five percent of Americans say police use deadly force only when necessary, while 45 percent say police are too quick to use deadly force.

When asked about most communities, 49 percent say police are more likely to use deadly force against a black person, 48 percent say race is not a factor, and 1 percent say police are more likely to use force against a white person.

The public typically sees things in a more positive light closer to home, and so Americans are less likely to say race affects the use of deadly force in their own communities. Sixty-three percent say race is not a consideration in their community, while 34 percent say police are more likely to use deadly force against a black person, and 1 percent say police are more likely to use force against a white person.

Minorities in the United States see things much differently. A large majority, 81 percent, of blacks say police use deadly force too quickly compared with 61 percent of Hispanics and 33 percent of whites.

Similarly, 85 percent of blacks think police are more likely to use force against a black person in most communities, compared with 63 percent of Hispanics and 39 percent of whites. Nearly as many, 71 percent, of blacks say police in their own community are more likely to use force against a black person compared with 47 percent of Hispanics and 24 percent of whites.

The growing concerns over the rate of violence in american college campuses

Americans as a whole show low levels of concern about violent crime. Nationwide, 13 percent of Americans say they are extremely or very worried about being a victim of a violent crime.

Twenty-seven percent say they are moderately worried, and 58 percent are only a little worried or not worried at all.

However, worries about violent crime vary considerably by race and ethnicity. Just 8 percent of whites say they are extremely or very worried about violent crime, but that rate jumps to 20 percent for Hispanics and 27 percent for blacks.

Along the same lines, racial differences in how well local police control crime emerge. While overall 36 percent of Americans say their local police are doing a very good or excellent job at controlling violent crime, just 16 percent of blacks agree, much less than the 42 percent of whites and 32 percent of Hispanics.

A majority of blacks 55 percent think their local police are doing a poor or fair job, compared with just a quarter of whites 24 percent.The Coddling of the American Mind. In the name of emotional well-being, college students are increasingly demanding protection from words and ideas they don’t like.

· A study published in the American Journal of Psychology found that the disclosure rate of LGBTQ college aged students who experienced intimate partner violence was significantly lower than their heterosexual counterparts, with 35% of LGBTQ students disclosing their assaults in comparison to approximately 75% of heterosexual leslutinsduphoenix.comence and incidence of rape and other sexual assault · LGBTQ studentsleslutinsduphoenix.com In other words, in the past few decades, prominent higher educational leaders, lawyers, and researchers have worked together to support race-conscious admissions policies, allowing college campuses to remain more racially and culturally diverse than most of the public schools their students attended prior to attending college.

· The Causes of Violence in America Stephen M. Krason The airwaves and the opinion columns continue to discuss the terrible December 14 school massacre in Connecticut and have brought us additional stories of senseless multiple murders in places like Oregon and western New leslutinsduphoenix.com://leslutinsduphoenix.com  · Descriptive statistics, background characteristics, exposure to the use and ownership of firearms, and attitudinal questions about safety concerns, victimization history, and opinions about allowing concealed carry on community college campuses were leslutinsduphoenix.com carry-guns-college-campus-research.

Mary Ann Bodine Al-Sharif and Penny A. Pasque discuss the climate at U.S. colleges and universities for Muslim students, faculty and staff. This is the latest post in a series sparked by recent student protests and the national dialogue on diversity and leslutinsduphoenix.com://leslutinsduphoenix.com

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